The Oriental Bank Corporation
1860-1869 - Galle

Currency Notes in Rupees issued from 1860 to 1869 by The Oriental Bank Corporation in Galle, with an engraving of Royal Crest and printed by Perkins, Bacon & Co, London.

Denomination: 5 Rupees
Note Color: Gray
English : Five Rupees
Sinhala : රුපියල්පහයි
Thamil : ஐந்துரூபாய்
Size : 171 x 129 mm
Date : 15th June 1866
Status : Signed
Pick-lk S147
Denomination: 10 Rupees
Note Color: Gray
English : Ten Rupees
Sinhala : රුපියල්දහයයි
Thamil : பத்துரூபாய்
Size : 202 x 126 mm
Date : 15th Feby 1867
Status : Signed cut
Pick-lk S148

Front: A decorated rectangular wide border with no text. Within border on top Center, below arced legend INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER crowned British Royal Coat of arms within belt with legend HONO SOIT QUI MAL Y PENSE (French motto of the order of Garter translates to "Shame be to him who thinks evil of it") with couchant lion crowned facing arms on left and couchant unicorn chained with garter looking back away from arms on right. Below in scroll DIEU ET MON DROIT (The French motto of the Monarch of the United Kingdom, translates to God and My Right.)
On either side alpha-numeric Denomination with unit below in decorate, with above රුපියල් Denomination in Sinhala on left and Denomination ரூபாய் in Thamil on right, with Serial No below. Centered below GALLE, CEYLON Date as Day Month Year.
Within shaded rectangle
THE ORIENTAL BANK CORPORATION Promises to pay Bearer on demand at their Branch here, or at their Bank in Colombo DENOMINATION RUPEES or the equivalent in the Currency of the Island, Value received
Below By Order of the Court of Directors above in one line
Entd _____ Accountt ______ Agent
In bottom left just inside border in small script Perkins, Bacon & Co, London. Patent Hardened Steel Plate..
Back: Spirographic design.
Watermark: ORIENTAL BANK in arc above CORPORATION in line below darker than paper

Note that these currency notes have been issued in Rupees when Pounds Sterling was legal and therefore has the phrase or the equivalent in the Currency of the Island, which is removed from the currency notes issued after monetary reform in 1869.

The Rs 50 note seems to had been cut in two. According to Mr Fred Medis many notes of this era were split in two for postal transmission. To send Money securely by post, one half of note was posted and only when receipt was acknowledged, was the other half posted.

Text and Images from Spink Auction listings Rs 5 and Rs 10. Auction Images at about 67 dpi

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